Posters and trailer for political intrigue drama Thankful for the Remaining Years

Thankful for the Remaining Years / Qing Yu Nian comes from Wang Juan, the writer of cult hits Turbulence of the Mu Clan, Legend of Southwest Dance and Music and Young Blood. Zhang Ruoyun is a forward-thinking noble intent on pushing through political reforms, most of which are opposed by the tyrannical ruler of Qing (Chen Daoming).

It’s rumoured Season 1 of 3 will premiere in less than a week. [Character Intros]

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Brief introduction to the characters in Thankful for the Remaining Years

Yes! Chen Daoming is back in drama land, and as a main character no less. In Thankful for the Remaining Years / Qing Yu Nian Season 1, he’ll be playing the tyrannical Emperor of the fictional country of Qing (he may be known as Liu Yu in the drama), a martial arts grand master and biological father of our protagonist Fan Xian (Zhang Ruoyun). Extended synopsis can be found here. (more…)

Han Han directs new movie “Continent”

704_1357045_130702Author and now director Han Han’s new movie, Continent 后会无期 (”We Won’t Meet Again”) will be hitting theaters on July 24. This is another coming-of-age story that Han Han is adapting from one of his own works, featuring Feng Shaofeng, Wang Luodan, Chen Bolin, Joe Chen, Wallace Chung, and Yuan Quan in its central cast (not bad!) They play a set of childhood friends, who have all grown up together on the east side and now set off for a somewhat reckless journey. Han Han recently released the theme song on Weibo, titled “Song of Dongji Island.” I’ve posted the video below, if you want a sneak peek at some scenes from the film, but be warned – it sounds more like the Marseillaise than a theme song for a movie! (The Dongji islands on the very easternmost border of mainland China).


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Upcoming Chinese Romance Movies of 2010

Sorry – the new site and forum is being fixed and worked out. We’ll make an announcement on this site when it is more  complete.

In the meantime, here’s a list of modern day romance movies to look forward to in 2010, because these films are covered less than the ancient/wuxia/martial arts films by English-language media and yet, China has completely nose-dived into this genre in the past year.  Cinema goers in China want the choice of  light-hearted entertainment from the cinema, and the Chinese film industry is rapidly accommodating that niche in the market.

Last year, there was only a small selection – this year there’s much much more. With China’s total box office up 44% in 2009, and 1.65 cinema screens added per day, with no signs of slowly down, this should only be one sign to look forward to of the growing diversification of China’s rapidly rising film industry.

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