Elaborate costuming for The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors

Taking matching as a couple to the next level…

The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors 天泪传奇之凤凰无双 has released more stills.  Starring Wang LikunJoe ChengAllen TingHe YanniZhang XiaolongBai BingXiong Naijin, Xia MinghaoHe JianzeMuqi Miya, and Li Zhengyang, these give us a better look at the detailing on the more elaborate costumes in this production.

More stills below the cut.

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Trailer for The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors

OoooOOOoooh! Isn’t it pretty?  Never mind that we had to catch an actual phoenix and pluck some feathers for that fan… and thus the title for this drama…

The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors 天泪传奇之凤凰无双 has released more stills and a trailer.  Starring Wang LikunJoe ChengAllen TingHe YanniZhang XiaolongBai BingXiong Naijin, Xia MinghaoHe JianzeMuqi Miya, and Li Zhengyang, erm… not familiar with the source material but this is anything but what I was expecting…

More stills below the cut.

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The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors also improves costuming

Sigh… Why couldn’t more of the stills be on par with this one?!?

The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors 天泪传奇之凤凰无双 has released more stills.  Starring Wang LikunJoe ChengAllen TingHe YanniZhang XiaolongBai BingXiong Naijin, Xia MinghaoHe JianzeMuqi Miya, and Li Zhengyang, these are a bit less… erm… oddly creative than the last ones were…

More posters below the cut.

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The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors releases character posters

Somebody kindly explain what comets have to do with the plot of this drama.

The Legend of Heavenly Tear: Phoenix Warriors 天泪传奇之凤凰无双 has released more character posters.  Starring Wang LikunJoe ChengAllen TingHe YanniZhang XiaolongBai BingXiong Naijin, Xia MinghaoHe JianzeMuqi Miya, and Li Zhengyang, those who liked the styling in the original images can take a look at more.

More posters below the cut (WARNING: SPOILERS at the bottom.).

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Celebrating with Jiangsu TV’s New Year Concert

It seems like a while since we have done a music-related post so here’s to Jiangsu TV’s New Year Concert, featuring some of the biggest artists in the greater China region and Asia including but not limited to A-meiStefanie SunJolin Tsai, Fenghuang ChuanqiLi JianHu YanbingSNH48The OneZheng ChunyuanLi YuchunJ.J. LinChi ChangxuLi RonghaoS.H.E.Fish LeongTan Weiwei, Piao ShuSha BaoliangTao JingyingEkin ChengLin XiaofengXie TianhuaQian JialeDeng LixinWu YufeiFu YingYang AijinT-araWu MochouWei ChenDong ChengpengLi Xiang, and singers from Yizhan Daodi.  All those people in that poster above.  Heck the freakin’ show comes in like FOUR OVER-ONE-HOUR SEGMENTS!!

More video links below the cut.

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This 11-year-old girl will make you feel woefully inadequate about your karaoke abilities

Thong Junjin’s performance of “Dawn” has been viewed more than 230 million times.

It seems nary a week goes by without some super talented, small Asian child making me feel deficient as a person. And I was feeling pretty good about myself this month, so this was probably overdue. Enter Thong Junjin 汤晶锦 (I’m about 80% sure the ‘h’ is silent).

Thong, an 11-year-old from Selangor, Malaysia, is a recent ‘graduate’ of China’s top-rating children’s talent show, Let’s Sing Kids 中国新声代, where she belted out Mandarin and Taiwanese hits by some of the biggest voices in the Chinese music scene, including A-mei, Han Hong and Tan Weiwei. If those names don’t sound familiar, Han Hong was described by one leading music critic as the Chinese-Tibetan love child of Celine Dion and Elton.

(It was me. I am the self-described leading music critic.)

Praised for her mature vocals and lyrical interpretation, this pint-sized powerhouse is also a viral sensation. Thong’s rendition of Han Hong’s “Dawn 天亮了” has received over 230 million views in just two months.

And it wasn’t even her best performance.

Watch more performances from the show, including some adorable musical child prodigies, and take part in our readers’ perceptions of adequacy poll, below. Continue reading

I Am A Singer Ep. 9: Jess Lee eats cherry tomatoes

Crab people, crab people. Taste like crab, talk like people.

Crab people, crab people. Taste like crab, talk like people.

Malaysian singer Jess Lee gasps in surprise as television personality, Rolling Wang (not to be confused with annoying viral chicken video songstress Rollin Wang), rolls into her hotel room with a breakfast cart adorned with breads, milk and fruit. Her eyes remain fixed on the food as he greets her and wishes her a happy new year.

Is that a plate of cherry tomatoes? Who eats just cherry tomatoes?

Is that a plate of cherry tomatoes? Who eats just cherry tomatoes?

Li Jian and his manager, Shen Mengchen, are the first to arrive on the I Am A Singer set. He flicks on the TV to inspect the competition. “Jess Lee,” Shen muses, tapping the remote to reveal her song choice. “Suffering.”
“I’ve never heard that song before,” admits Li Jian. “Have you?”
“No, I haven’t. Let’s put it on now.”
This isn’t the first time a Chinese celebrity has claimed not to know Jess Lee.

Meanwhile, in the halls of HunanTV headquarters, Han Hong examines a poster of Jane Zhang wearing a stunning white and gold dress.

Meanwhile, in the halls of HunanTV headquarters, Han Hong examines a poster of Jane Zhang wearing a stunning white and gold dress.

Some of the contestants are taking naps on their sofas. Li Jian and The One, too tall for the furniture, dangle their limbs off the side. Han Hong fits snuggly within the arm rests.


Li Jian
Bonds 尘缘 by Roman Tam

Li Jian is looking rather snazzy. He’s wearing a charcoal suit with a purple crew-neck tee and pocket square. And a watch on his right hand, oddly enough. I am totally going to steal this look for my next business casual event (I think this qualifies as business casual).

Li Jian’s performances tend to be very hit or miss. This one’s a miss. It’s slow, with no real musical or vocal climax. And that’s typical Li Jian. But it doesn’t have that unique “oomph” that makes Li Jian’s good performances good. His better songs usually come when they’re less piano-driven. Unfortunately, this one is super pianoed-up. It’s altogether a bit dull.

Hey, there’s a Caucasian dude watching the show. I bet we’ll be seeing a lot of him tonight.

It's a good thing there's a white person in the audience. Otherwise, we wouldn't know if our opinions are valid or not.

It’s a good thing there’s a white person in the audience. Otherwise, we wouldn’t know if our opinions are valid or not.

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The Voice of China returns for season three

This is the first time that I've written something 3,000 words long since graduating from college.

This is the first time that I’ve written something 3,000-words-long since graduating from college.

No A-mei or Harlem this year, but The Voice of China 中国好声音 comes back big with a new judge, an old judge, and a fresh batch of talent. The season three Voice premiere saw the introduction of first-time mentor, Taiwanese singer-songwriter Chyi Chin 齐秦, replacing Harlem Yu, and the return of Yang Kun who replaced A-mei (who replaced Yang Kun the year before). The mentor lineup now stands as:

  • Na Ying 那英
  • Wang Feng 汪峰
  • Yang Kun 杨坤
  • Chyi Chin 齐秦

With the addition of Chyi Chin, the judging panel now becomes 50% Manchu, much like the Qing Grand Council in the 18th century. The more you know.
Chyi Chin is a strange choice. He wasn’t especially popular on I Am A Singer. I would have liked Coco Lee. Speaking of whom, have you registered for auditions for Chinese Idol yet?

This post is the first in a series of weekly recaps for The Voice of China. Review the second episode here.


If you you’re the type of Voice viewer who only occasionally watches clips of performances, feel free to skip ahead for the videos.

The episode begins with Na Ying walking on stage, singing fellow mentor Wang Feng’s Braveheart 勇敢的心. Her placard-wielding teenage entourage seems a little bit lost and not at all excited to be on TV. In contrast, when fans get this close to The Voice UK judges, crotches get grabbed.
Yang Kun is the second judge to make an appearance, transitioning the medley into Chyi Chin’s Heartless Rain, Heartless You 无情的雨无情的你. Wang Feng then appears to sing Na Ying’s The Day Doesn’t Understand the Dark of Night 白天不懂夜的黑. I am sensing a trend here. If the next mentor sings a Yang Kun song, I am going to reward myself with a doughnut. Wang Feng is singing for a long time compared to the others before him.
Finally, Chyi Chin takes the stage with Yang Kun’s The Moon Can Represent My Heart 月亮可以代表我的心. I think I’ll go for cinnamon. The other judges, having taken their seats, tap their buzzers and swivel around to choose Chyi Chin, welcoming him into the fold. Ah, yes, very symbolic and creative. All four judges return to the stage and finish off with Braveheart.


Liu Zhijia 刘至佳
19, Chonqing
Girl On Fire by Alicia Keys

This university student kicks off the very first audition of the year with the introduction to the Black Eyed Peas’ Let’s Get It Started. It’s similar to Laure Shang’s performance on I Am A Singer. She then begins to rap an unknown song before finally settling on Girl On Fire. Liu half-yodels, half-grunts the Alicia Keys’ number, sounding a bit like the lovechild of Christina Aguilera and Shakira. Her voice is strong, but lacks control. All judges except Na Ying turn for her. Continue reading

Shila Amzah sings Let It Go in three languages on… on this Chinese TV show

Friday night provided a double dose of Shila, with appearances on Day Day Up and I Am A Singer.

Friday night provided a double dose of Shila, with appearances on Day Day Up and I Am A Singer.

Apparently, the Internet has decided that the English title for the popular Chinese variety show 天天向上 Tiāntiān Xiàngshàng should be “Day Day Up.” Day. Day. Up.
I feel as if I should have been consulted on this… I don’t like it very much.

I Am A Singer contestant Shila Amzah was joined by compatriot Gary Chaw in showcasing her dance and vocal talents on the aforementioned television show Friday evening. The Malaysian songstress performed a multicultural array of hits, including songs by Adele, Paramore and Beyoncé, as well as in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Malay, the Hindi Bollywood number Bole Chudiyan, and the Tibetan-themed Tibetan Plateau 青藏高原.

Tackling the Oscar-winning Disney song, Shila transitioned seemlessly between Let It Go, 隨它吧 (sui ta ba) and Bebaskan, the English, Chinese and Malay versions of the Frozen hit respectively. Continue reading

I Am A Singer semifinals: Shining favourites, MH370 conspiracies and angry Malaysians

Hunan TV's I Am A Singer topped the ratings last night, beating out rival singing contest, Sing My Song, and a really cool scientific game show.

Hunan TV’s I Am A Singer topped the ratings last night, beating out rival singing contest, Sing My Song, and a really cool scientific game show.

I Am A Singer 我是歌手 drew one step closer to crowning its second season champion as the hit show’s semifinal aired last night. And while the performance results mostly mirrored the trends of previous weeks, Malaysian fans quickly took to social media to voice their discontent over Shila Amzah’s anomalous sixth place showing. Some questioned whether her low score was the result of Chinese backlash over the Malaysian government’s handling of the Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 investigation. More on that later.

Chinese reality singing contests often follow unconventional formats compared to their international counterparts. So if you’re confused as to how someone actually wins this show, or why a previously eliminated contestant is back on stage, here’s a quick guide. But if you’ve been following the show and just want to watch the videos and read some rants and reviews, feel free to skip ahead! Continue reading