[Lyrics] Among the Peach Blossoms

I use the mountains as my canvas,
I control the waterfalls with my paintbrush,
From up to downstream,
the stream carries my flow
So dope it makes the world jealous

The imagery painted in  Among the Peach Blossoms 桃之夭夭 are some of the best so far out of the often rambling Zhao Yongxin. Complete with a rap in literary Chinese, lines sung in the style of Yi folk songs, zhongguofeng-arrangement,  and weird English lyrics,  the song is like a huge smorgasbord  of Zhao Yongxin’s mind.

The song  was inspired by a late-night literary talk show that Zhao Yongxin watched that used the title of the song, 桃之夭夭. He loved the imagery of the word, and so  a few days later,  he called up  buddy  Zhang Jinghao (Yaoband)  and they wrote it in one night. To be honest, Zhang Jinghao probably wrote that best verse since it sounds like his style.

 

See that waterlily emerging out of the water,
Who can resist but fall in love with its reflections in the pond.
The rainbow among the rose-blush* skies,
Can also know the flames of a mortal life*,
Crazy like me.

 

How long must I wait
After the clouds gather and the rain falls, *
After the winds blow and the snow falls, *
Who will lose guard,*

When tomorrow’s moon comes,
Who will share a drink with me.
I pick up my paintbrush, ready to compose,
The ink drops from the paintbrush
The tear drops from the heart-broken man.

 

Among the peach blossoms*
Sailing with the flow
Among the quaint landscapes,
South of the clouds *
I use the mountains as my canvas,
I control the waterfalls with my paintbrush,
From upstream to downstream,
the stream carries my flow
So dope it makes the world jealous *

*cool literary Chinese  rap here*
*too hard to translate *

QED: With you by my side, I can block out the entire world.
I’m a well-endowed man.
I’m rich man, the wise will know.
Excite me more,
Stimulate me more
What time is it?
I don’t care.*!*

* 胭脂 is rouge used as blush/lip cream in ancient China. Can be used to refer to feminine beauty.
*人间烟火 Literally the foods of mortals (as opposed to immortals who are too good for mortal food).
*翻云覆雨 comes from a poem by Du Fu complaining about how  some people’s attitude to relationships are as unpredictable as the weather
*风花雪月 – originally  used to describe vacuous poetry describing the scenery, it was later  used to describe decadent lifestyles and romances. Historically used with a negative connotation, the term has been used positively in recent years.
*翻云覆雨之后风花雪月失守 Knowing M.I.C., I’m going to guess this line is a fancy metaphor for either stormy sex, a relationship where one side got tricked into sleeping with the other one, or both.
*明月几时有 comes from a poem by Su Shi that asks when was the bright moon first created? The poem compare the waning and waxing of the moon to the uniting and separation of people on Earth. I translated it using a very literal take  to make sense of it with the next line.
*桃之夭夭 is a reference to a Zhou dynasty song  in the Book of Songs that compares a bride to the rosiness of the peach blossoms
*Zhao Yongxin is from the province Yunnan, which literally translate to South of the Clouds.
*some  creative license used in translating 世人妒之

*!* As I was translating this last segment, it dawned on me that this entire song could just be about Zhao Yongxin finally getting in the pants of a woman he’s like for a long time, and all that gorgeous scenic imagery could actually just be a fancier metaphor than watering your vase in My Place.

I demand a personal apology from  Zhao Yongxin and  Zhang Jinghao for tricking me.

 

Chen Yao cross-gender casted for Wuxin: The Monster Killer 2

Yue Qishan is back, this time once more in a male body.

Born a male Taoist practitioner but appearing in season 1 in the form a 16-year-old girl whose body he took over,  Chen Yao’s Yue Qishan is one of the most interesting characters in recent Chinese TV.   This time, he’s  back once more in a male body.

Based on the book of the same name, Wuxin: The Monster Killer 2  无心法师2continues the story of monster hunter Wuxin (Han Dongjun)  and evil spirit Yue Qishan as they wake up  20 years later, in Republican Era Shanghai.  Female lead Jin Chen has been replaced with newcomer Li Landi, but the new ending MV still looks pretty awesome.

Princess Agents OP continues to rule

When was the last time a woman sang the exciting OP about ruling the world?    Props to  Princess Agents for breaking the mold of a fastbeat male opening song and a romantic female ending song.

Between this, the Advisors Alliance, and Rush to the Dead Summer, this summer just might make up for the lackluster showing last year.

Featuring an ancient drama female lead with an actual goal in mind (and to free the slaves that she was once a part of, no less), and whose romantic deal breaker is politics, this could very well be Zhao Liying’s breakthrough role to launch her out of cutesy roles.   OP is by Zhang Bichen and Zhao Liying.