Hey, that chubby Taiwanese boy on the Voice of China looks familiar…

Oh, that chubby Taiwanese boy!

Lin Yuchun 林育群, who first shot to fame in 2010 when his performance of Whitney Houston’s I Will Always Love You went viral, auditioned for the Voice of China’s second season with 星星 (I’m Not a Star) by Shunza 順子.

Surprisingly on two counts, Na Ying was the only judge to activate her chair-spinning button for Lin, but failed to recognise the Internet singing sensation.

*“Hey, fatty, what are you doing here?” a surprised Harlem Yu remarked after Lin’s performance.
A-mei gave a look of puzzled recognition as she stood from her chair. “Hey, are you…” She squinted. “…are you?”
“It’s the little chubster, Lin Yuchun!” Harlem exclaimed matter-of-factly.
“Who?” asked Na Ying, apparently not recognising her newly claimed protégé.
“Are you really?” A-mei said.
“I am,” the bow-tied 27-year-old replied bashfully. “Hi, guys~”

Harlem and A-mei then collectively educated Na Ying on Lin Yuchun’s performances in the US and Japan, which was followed by a short, obligatory rendition of I Will Always Love You.

“Now that you’re on The Voice of China—and especially since you’re on my team,” Na Ying began, “I promise you that from the North to the South, wherever people eat rice and speak Chinese, everyone will know the name Lin Yuchun. Welcome to my team!”
(Her speech sounded more poetic in Chinese.)
The elated Lin ran up to hug her.
“Oh, you really are fat,” said Na Ying as her arms failed to connect behind his back.

This episode also marked the final round of auditions, with the mentoring segment of the show to air next week. No wild card round this time, it seems.

* = Just assume from this point that I’ve made some incredibly liberal use of artistic license in my translations

5 thoughts on “Hey, that chubby Taiwanese boy on the Voice of China looks familiar…

  1. Pingback: The Voice of China: YouTube stars, Kpop stars, and too many Chyi Chin songs | Cfensi

  2. I just hated that you dubbed the singing part of this video and changed it to a recorded song.

  3. It’s so tacky to continually refer to him as ‘fatty’. some chinese are so mean-spirited and shallow.

    • In China, nicknames like Zhuangzhuang or Xiaopang are usually endearing terms that elders can chose to call their kids. It’s kind of like how in Spanish, people would call their kids chicken or dog.

  4. your translations made my day (this was really cute~)
    although i feel kind of bad that they keep calling him fat

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